One line dating scams

Selfies of women with low-cut vest tops were most commonly used, with female fraudsters describing themselves as a student, with no strong political leanings.

She is described as 5ft 6in, never married, and has a degree-level education.

The most common fake male profile, meanwhile, has light brown hair and is in his forties.

Forty-eight was the most common age found across the profiles.

Scammers will pose under the disguise of beautiful pictures as either male or female claiming to be from the United States.

The scammer weaves a story of a successful business person working over seas, having no family; they present themselves as a thoughtful, caring and loving individual who is looking for their soul mate.

Often the scammer will say an emergency situation has arisen and money is needed fast to avoid dire consequences. If you go weak at the knees for a blue-eyed brunette, you could be headed for danger as experts have revealed these are some of the most common traits found in romance scammers.With almost 8 million people using online dating in the UK, fraudsters know exactly how to get people clicking on their profiles and they'll make sure they use the right photographs to lure their victims in.(It is estimated that only 15 percent of fraud victims report their losses to law enforcement, so the real numbers are probably higher.) As one result, fear of a horrible first date is just one of the things a would-be online dater has to worry about. “Most people think the victims are middle-aged women who can't get a date, but I have worked with men and women of all ages—doctors and lawyers, CEOs of companies, people from the entertainment industry—who you’d never think in a million years would fall for these scams but do,” says Barb Sluppick, who runs romancescams.org, a watchdog site and online support group.According to the Consumer Reports 2016 Online Dating Survey of more than 114,000 subscribers, among the respondents who were considering online dating but were hesitant, 46 percent said they were concerned about being scammed. “Typically the scammer builds trust by writing long letters over weeks or months and crafting a whole persona for their victims,” says Unit Chief David Farquhar from the Financial Crimes Section of the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) who specializes in cyber-related crimes.

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